Vernon Soccer Club

Futsal

The VSC is currently offering Futsal in a clinic style training environment over the winter months. We are looking to expand our offering as demand warrents.

Futsal is an exciting, fast-paced small sided soccer game that is played across the world and is officially recognized by both FIFA and UEFA.

Futsal earned the status of FIFA's official form of indoor soccer in the 1980s as it was recognized as a scaled down version of outdoor soccer played indoors. It is a 5 v 5 small-sided game played on a hard surfaced, basketball sized court with a smaller, low bounce ball. Futsal is played with touchline boundaries and without walls.

Futsal places a large emphasis on technical skill in high pressure situations which can be translated into the outdoor game. The sport is a great skill developer as it demands quick reflexes, fast thinking and pin-point passing.

Futsal is played in all the continents of the world by over 100 countries with 12 million players. Great soccer superstars such as Pele, Zico, Ronaldo, Messi, Kaka and Katia grew up playing the game and credit futsal with developing their skills.

Why Futsal?

The priority in Futsal is to motivate players in an environment that is conducive to learning. The more pleasure kids derive from their participation, the more they wish to play and practice on their own. While their instinct to play is natural, their affection and appreciation for soccer must be cultivated. Futsal is the foundation to such goals because it:

  • Allows players to frequently touch the ball.
  • Presents many opportunities to score goals and score goals often.
  • Encourages regaining possession of the ball as a productive, fun and rewarding part of the game (defending).
  • Maximizes active participation and minimizes inactivity and boredom.
  • Reflects the philosophy of player development expressed in state and national coaching schools.
  • Eliminates complicated rules such as off-sides that may hinder youngsters from "playing".

Futsal is a sport that is a derivative of soccer and played with five-man teams on a basketball style court with no walls and a smaller, low-bouncing ball. Great soccer superstars such as Pele, Zico, Ronaldo and Neymar grew up playing the game and credit futsal with developing their skills. In the past few years, futsal has experienced a massive growth in popularity.

In Futsal, players often find themselves one-on-one against an opponent and quick decision making is important. ... In America, soccer coaches always talk aboutdeveloping decision-making skills in 1v1 situations. Futsal provides youth soccerplayers with the perfect environment to improve these skills.

Futsal Rules

20-minute periods
Futsal matches comprise two periods each lasting 20 minutes of actual playing time. The clock is stopped every time the ball goes out of play and is restarted when play resumes.

Time outs
Teams are entitled to a one-minute time-out in each period. A team that does not request a time-out in the first half of the match is only entitled to one time-out during the second half. There are no time-outs in extra time.

Unlimited substitutions
A match is played by two teams, each consisting of not more than five players (a goalkeeper and four outfield players) and nine substitutes. There is no restriction on the number of substitutions that may be made during a match. Substitutions may be made at any time, whether the ball is in play or not, but only in the specially demarcated substitution zones.

Replacement of sent-off players
A substitute player may replace a sent-off player and enter the pitch two full minutes after the sending-off. They may, however, enter the pitch before the two minutes have elapsed should their team concede a goal while a player down.

The goalkeepers
Goalkeepers have only four seconds in which to play the ball, with either their hands or feet, and may not touch it again if it has been deliberately played to them by a team-mate without an opponent playing or touching it. Goalkeepers are also now free to play anywhere on the pitch and throw the ball beyond the halfway line, which was not previously permitted.

Accumulated fouls and the second penalty mark
Accumulated fouls are those penalised with a direct free-kick or penalty kick, regardless of whether advantage has been played or not. If a team commits a sixth accumulated foul, the opposing side may take the subsequent free-kick awarded to them without a wall, either from the second penalty mark, which is positioned four metres behind the first, or from a position even closer to the penalty area if the foul was committed between the goal line and the second penalty mark.

Two more things
Unlike 11-a-side football, goals may not be scored directly from the kick-off in futsal and there is no offside.

 
The Rules of Futsal (Futsala) - EXPLAINED!